Museums and Art

Hope, Gustav Klimt, 1903

Hope, Gustav Klimt, 1903

Hope - Gustav Klimt. 1903

In 1903, Klimt wrote "Hope" (National Gallery of Canada, Ottawa), also a response to eschatological expectations of the turn of the century. However, this response is rather optimistic: the red-haired woman in the full-length picture is already familiar to us Nuda Veritas, this time pregnant: she looks at the rounded belly and symbolizes the expectation of a soon birth of a bright and eternal.

The upper part of the work depicts distorted painful grimaces of “hostile forces” and a human skull - a sign of death. They are very close to the woman, behind her, but will be trampled upon by what is hidden in her womb. An analogy with the Christian theme and the image of the Mother of God, who gave birth to the Savior’s world, suggests itself. However, the figure of Hope was written from a prostitute, this circumstance, in turn, sheds light on the ethical views of the artist.


Watch the video: Through the Eyes of the Artist: Gustav Klimt (October 2021).